Study Suggests Cannabidiol Reduces TSC Related Seizures

Cannabidiol and tuberous sclerosis

Results of a small observational study involving tuberous sclerosis patients using cannabidiol (CBD) offers some hope to sufferers.

Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), not be confused with tuberculosis, is an incurable genetic condition that features benign tumor growths on the brain and other vital organs. Among the symptoms of TSC are seizures, which are experienced by around 85% of those with the condition. In Australia, more than 2,000 people suffer from Tuberous sclerosis complex and nearly1 million people worldwide are estimated to have TSC.

In the study, ten TSC patients in Mexico experiencing seizures were undergoing CBD treatment. Seizures were decreased for 7 patients, with significant decreases in 6 (80-100% decrease) and minor decreases in 1.

“The experience of parents and patients with medicinal cannabis (CBD), as reported in our survey, suggests that CBD reduced the frequency, intensity, and duration of convulsive crises secondary to TSC,” says the study’s conclusion. “Additionally, the reports indicate that there was improvement in other clinical symptoms.”

The other clinical symptoms included mood, cognition, sleep and appetite.

Mild adverse effects in pediatric patients were reported in 4 cases, but did not require a lowering or suspending of CBD administration. The study notes that treatment with CBD is also more economical than conventional medications.

The full survey report, which was published in the Journal of Advances in Medicine and Medical Research, can be viewed here (PDF). The research was led by Dr. Carlos G. Aguirre, who has 30 years experience as a Pediatric Neurology Specialist

Another study out of Mexico we reported on earlier this year indicated cannabidiol can contribute to a significant reduction in the frequency of seizures in Lennox-Gastaut patients.

In June this year, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto made medical cannabis products with 1 percent THC or lower legal, opening the door to widespread cannabidiol use in the nation. Rules are yet to be established, but if a deadline is met in December, products should be available from pharmacies early next year.

The pressure is now on Mexico’s government to broaden its medical cannabis laws to allow high-THC medications to be made legally available.